Martial Arts

INTRODUCTORY NOTE:

Martial Arts features were produced en masse by producers in Hong Kong, Korea, and other Asian locations, primarily during the 1970s and 1980s.  The producers frequently licensed a title “exclusively” to one company in the U.S., and then renamed it and licensed it to another company, also “exclusively.”  The producers rarely registered the movies for copyright.  Accordingly, the bulk of the movies in this catalog, unless specifically described otherwise, should be regarded as public domain, in the sense that exclusivity cannot be guaranteed.

It is difficult to even identify the movies from their titles, since the Asian actors’ names are transliterated, and are often spelled differently in English, from the same credits for the same movie under a different title.  Similarly, the movies were generally licensed with full-color theatrical posters, but the posters were generic, with different titles being printed for the same movie, depending on what the licensee thought it was licensing or buying. Further, the delivery materials frequently consisted of one or two 35mm prints, that could be used for theatrical projection on the “action track” downtown theaters were the genre was most popular; the technical quality of the video masters made from them, is frequently less than optimum.

The exceptions occur when the producers were recognized, legitimate companies, such as Toei, which produced two of the films starring Sonny Chiba, to a company now owned by Films Around The World, Inc.; Toei has confirmed to potential licensees that the rights are indeed owned, in perpetuity.  Somewhat in the middle, are martial arts films produced in Italy; generally, they were multi-country co-productions, with each producer feeling free to apply its own title; they are more easily identifiable because the Western actors are much more recognizable than the Asian actors.  

The point which we hope is being made, is that if exclusivity, copyright protection, and first-rate masters are absolutely required, such assurances cannot be given for many films in this genre.  The only distribution rights claimed by FATW, are for the U.S. and Canada and the territories, installations, possessions, and so on, which customarily go with them.

All of the features in this catalog are or will be available on video through our Mr. FAT-W Video label.  The titles of some of our features are:

BLAZING NINJA, THE
CHAMP AGAINST CHAMP
DEADLY SHAOLIN LONGFIST
DEATH RIVALS OF SHAOLIN
DON’T TURN THE OTHER CHEEK  THE DRAGON'S INFERNAL SHOWDOWN (a/k/a LONG HU XUAN FENG (original title))
DUEL OF THE IRON FIST (a/k/a THE DUEL, a/k/a DA JUE DOU (original title) )
DYNAMITE DRAGON
HONORABLE HORSE
INFRA-MAN
KARATE WARRIORS
KUNG FU-RY!
MANTIS VERSUS THE FALCON CLAWS
REVOLT OF THE DRAGON
RIVALS OF THE DRAGON
SHAOLIN: THE BLOOD MISSION
SONNY CHIBA'S DRAGON PRINCESS
WORLD OF THE DRUNKEN MASTER, THE

We have many more, and as we release them, we'll add to the list.  The following page has links to the titles which are currently available on the Mr. FAT-W Video label through Amazon.com.


BLAZING NINJA, THE

1973, 77 mins., color

Director:                   Godfrey Ho
Writers:                     On Szeto
Producers:                Richard Ahn, George Lai, Joseph Lai, Tomas Tang
Editor:                       Vincent Leung (as Leung Wing Chan)
Cast:                           Yi Tao Chang, Sony Tanaka, Ronny Lee, Tim Chen, Sandy Peng, Buck Kong,
                                    Alex Lim, Tong Kin Yat, Michael Ray, Buddy Yang, Carl Leung, Jimmy Lai,
                                    Jackie Siu, Su-Cheon Bae, Eagle Han, Dong-ho Kim, Kang-jo Lee, Hsiu-chen
                                    Lu

Synopsis:    “The print I saw, from Saturn Productions Video, was terrible. However, pristine picture quality could not save this film. The "huh?" plot concerns Chinese underground agents battling Japanese invaders, yet the whole thing takes place in the 1970's. The main Japanese villain sports the world's worst combover, and the movie ends so suddenly, I wondered what exactly was cut out. Add mediocre fight scenes, and "The A-Team" type plot points, and this is a loser. Silliest of all is that the secret, elite agents communicate by passing notes to each other like a bunch of fourth graders. Not rated, but equivalent to a PG13.” Internet Movie Database

        “Godfrey Ho doesn't usually bother much with plots, not when he has so much random-guys-fighting footage with which to pad his films. Ho doesn't dispense with this practice in The Blazing Ninja, allotting considerable screen time to slap-heavy battles between unintroduced characters. However, he gets relatively ambitious with his central storyline, weaving a melancholic tale of star-crossed romance. It's like Romeo and Juliet meets a martial-arts film where hapless brawlers play ventriloquist's dummies to shrill, trained-parrot voice actors.

        “Nothing like this happens in this film. The Blazing Ninja ostensibly takes place in the late 1930s or early 1940s, when relations between China and Japan were at their ugliest. (Ho later exploited the era's wartime atrocities during his unauthorized Men Behind The Sun sequels.) In this film's anachronistic depiction of that time period, people wear '70s clothes, drive '70s cars and trigger funk from blaxploitation soundtracks whenever they start kung-fu fighting. Other customs unique to the fake '40s: Villains and heroic rebels alike celebrate every achievement with uproarious laughter, and members of clandestine militant organizations communicate by passing notes like grade-school girls.

        “In the movie's first scrutable scene, murderous bandits burst into guffaws after raising a toast "to our dear dead friend!" An interloping avenger snarls at these "ninja bastards." (No one in this film resembles a ninja in terms of appearance or skill, so viewers just have to follow the dialogue clues.) The ninja-basher shoves an attacker, which coincidentally causes a stiff dummy to fall flatly from a ledge.”   Www.somethingawful.com


CHAMP AGAINST CHAMP (a/k/a CHAMP VS. CHAMP a/k/a MARTIAL MONKS OF
             SHAOLIN TEMPLE, a/k/a TO THANASIMO HTYPIMA TOU DRAKOU (Greek title)

1983; color; 88 mins.

Director:                  Godfrey Ho (as Elton Chong)
Writer:                     Richard Sam    
Producer:                George Lai
Exec.Prod.:             George Lai
Music:                      Ricky Chan         
Cinematog.:            Joey Mah
Cast:                         Dragon Lee, Jang Lee Hwang, Gene Chan, Charlie Han, Bettrice Lau,
                                   Jacky Lung, Antonio Sieou, Doris Tsui        

Synopsis:    “Before his disastrous and seemingly limitless "Ninja" series, Godfrey Ho and producer Joseph Lai had jumped on the Brucesploitation bandwagon with a string of chop sockeys starring their protégé Dragon Lee. Champ Against Champ from 1983 is a classic example of Ho and Lai's mad, BAD kung fu with Dragon as Lee Wong, an innocent who runs foul of baddie Master Kai. Kai is obsessed with a list of traitors plotting against him, and targets old man Tai, whose daughter Sing is promised to Dragon Lee, as the ringleader.

        “Tai is captured and tortured by Kai, and Dragon Lee cops a poisoned arrow through the thigh, forcing him to get his leg amputated. This causes him great unhappiness and sexual insecurity, and he hooks up with Master Wai (not to be confused with Master Kai or Tai). The old man with flowing white robe and mustache inspires him with the story of "Steel Leg, the Great Master of the 18 Kicks" - a man who just happens to be Sing's grandfather! Incredibly, she still has the key to his one-legged training room and fake limb instruction manual. At one point during a disco-driven montage, Dragon pulls his new metal leg out of a bucket of water and asks Sing her opinion. "Ooooh. It's really good," she replies in a schoolgirl voice.

        “One of the Ten Commandments of Bad Kung Fu requires insane dubbing to go with the insane plot machinations. For Champ Against Champ, it seems cheapskates Ho and Lai used a dubbing studio in Hong Kong with local British non-talent, so that the results are almost Pythonesque. Tai is given a Mr Gumby voice, a thug says Master Wai, "You long-haired son of a she-goat!", and classical music plays during a fight scene in a deliberate or otherwise nod to A Clockwork Orange. Intentional comedy relief comes in the form of a henpecked innkeeper with a red nose, and unintentional comedy each time the rest of the cast opens their mouths. "You stinking turd! Rot in hell!" Like the list of Bruce Lee clones, the quotable quotes are without end.

        “As the plot spirals out of control, Dragon fights a guy who breathes fire, teams up with a guy who's the spitting image of Garry Glitter, and faces a squad of ninja she-bitches with voices like backpackers from Peckham, who can turn invisible or shape-shift into evil looking clowns. In the Battle of the Sexies, featuring sped up footage that makes the girls look like bikini bimbots from the Benny Hill Show, Dragon wins by tying their apron strings together. In the final confrontation with Kai, Dragon appears to have gained magical powers as well as his own sound effect - the metal leg's kick sounds like someone hitting a shopping trolley with a rolling pin. In the "amputee revenge" subgenre, only the Shaw Brothers' Crippled Avengers, in which a guy gets BOTH legs replaced with tin loafers, comes close to the dizzying heights of watching Dragon Lee clanging his way through Champ Against Champ.”  Internet Movie Database

Note: Released theatrically in the U.S. on the “action track” by Silverstein Films, Inc., now renamed Filmworld Distributors, Inc., a subsidiary of Films Around The World, Inc.
                               

DEADLY SHAOLIN LONGFIST (a/k/a SHAOLIN - THANATIFORO HTYPIMA KARATE)

1983, 86 mins., 1.35:1, color

Director:            Philip Chan
Cast:                    Natassa Chan, Bruce Cheung, Elton Chong, Beau Wan, Mike Wong

Review:    “this one's obviously quite underrated.i bought it back in 1990 and i'd have thought there would've been more reviews on this kung fu cult classic.obviously it has'nt gotten enough exposure.i've watched the whole thing plenty of times.at least 3 or 4 times allready and i wish soon that i'll have the opportunity to let someone else enjoy this unforgettable thrilling rollercoaster ride of a kick ass flick that it truly is.no doubt.you gotta see it to believe it.the scenes are truly memorable and they play in you're head years after you've seen it. freaky as that sounds.i think that it's benefitted myself for my lasting interest in preserving myself to hopefully become like that ultimate fighting machine old guy dude towards the end.what a dramatic conclusion that was.he takes on 3 of the heroes and almost beats them all.it's really unbelievable.that dude's got to be at least 60 something and he fights with incredible proficiency ,power and unforgettable speed! totally riveting and entertaining to say the least. a classic kung fu powerhouse,masterpiece.10/10,for sure. ps-certainly a groundbreaker and a must see for any type of martial arts fan.”
         Internet Movie Database


DEADLY SILVER NINJA, THE  (a/k/a  DRAGON THE YOUNG MASTER (original Hong Kong
                   title), a/k/a DRAGON THE MASTER, a/k/a ZMAJ, MLADI GOSOPODAR)

982;  color; 120 Mins.

Director:                    Godfrey Ho
Producer:                   George Lai, Joseph Lai, Tomas Tang
Editor:                        Vincent Leung (as Leung Wing Chan)
Cast:                            Min Kyu Choi, Ben Lee, Kelvin Chan, Jackie Lee, Tony Min, Steve Lin, King
                                      Ki Chu, Wong Tin, Wallace Sah, Dragon Lee, Qui Yuen

Good-guy vs. bad-guy; good guy wins.

Note: Released theatrically in the U.S. on the “action track” by Silverstein Films, Inc., now renamed Filmworld Distributors, Inc., a subsidiary of Films Around The World, Inc.


DEADLY SHAOLIN LONGFIST (a/k/a SHAOLIN - THANATIFORO HTYPIMA KARATE)

1983, 86 mins., 1.35:1, color

Director:                     Philip Chan
Cast:                             Natassa Chan, Bruce Cheung, Elton Chong, Beau Wan, Mike Wong

Review:    “this one's obviously quite underrated.i bought it back in 1990 and i'd have thought there would've been more reviews on this kung fu cult classic.obviously it has'nt gotten enough exposure.i've watched the whole thing plenty of times.at least 3 or 4 times allready and i wish soon that i'll have the opportunity to let someone else enjoy this unforgettable thrilling rollercoaster ride of a kick ass flick that it truly is.no doubt.you gotta see it to believe it.the scenes are truly memorable and they play in you're head years after you've seen it. freaky as that sounds.i think that it's benefitted myself for my lasting interest in preserving myself to hopefully become like that ultimate fighting machine old guy dude towards the end.what a dramatic conclusion that was.he takes on 3 of the heroes and almost beats them all.it's really unbelievable.that dude's got to be at least 60 something and he fights with incredible proficiency ,power and unforgettable speed! totally riveting and entertaining to say the least. a classic kung fu powerhouse,masterpiece.10/10,for sure. ps-certainly a groundbreaker and a must see for any type of martial arts fan.”   Internet Movie Database


DEATH RIVALS OF SHAOLIN (a/k/a KUNG FU, THE INVINCIBLE FIST, a/k/a E HU KUANG
        LONG (original Hong Kong title), a/k/a DER SCHLAGHAMMER AUS SHANGHAI, a/k/a
        DRAGON AND TIGER WAYS, a/k/a KUNG FU, THE INVINCIBLE FIST, a/k/a NGO FU
        WONG LUNG (original Hong Kong Cantonese title), a/k/a THE GOOD AND THE BAD
        (original Hong Kong English title), a/k/a TIGER VS. DRAGON (alternate Hong Kong
        English title)

1972, color, 87 mins.

Director:                  See-Yuen Ng
Producer:                Jimmy L. Pascual (as Chu Won Yin)
Music:                      Fu Liang Chou
Cinamatog.:           Chi Chang
Editor:                     Ming Sung
Cast:                         Sing Chen, Yasuaki Kurata, Irene Ryder, Yuan-sheng Huang, Wai-Man Chan,
                                  Yuan Chieh, Nan Chiang, Kwok Choi Hon, Shao-hung Chan, Yueh Sheng Chien,
                                  Ming Chin, Ho Chiu Kei, Siu-Lung Leung, Han Ling, Ke Ming Lin, Tsim Po
                                   Sham, Hsu-shun Yang

Review:    “That doesn't make this a good movie, but it's a tiny bit better than his other pairing with Kurata, available through Netflix under the title "Rage of the Wind." So what's good about this one, and why would anyone want to watch it now?

        First, there is the magnificent Chen Sing in his prime. As a short, powerfully muscled man, Chen was never a master of technique like Bruce Lee. Rather he carried his films with his burning intensity and what Lee called emotional content. The intensity is what made him a great villain in most of his films, and such a pleasure to watch in his few hero roles like this one. Second, and equally impressive in a different way, is Kurata of the flamboyant eyebrows. Showing a constant air of boredom with the slow-witted Chinese around him, but turning instantly into a lightning-fast fighting machine when necessary, Kurata was the perfect counterpart to Chen's dogged tenacity. Third, there's Irene Ryder, Hong Kong singing star of the early 70's, who made a couple of these movies as an adjunct to her main career. In this one, she had to act as well as look pretty. It doesn't work -- she couldn't act her way out of a paper bag -- but it's nice to see her at her most attractive. Fourth, ladies, there's junior lead Bruce Leung at his most handsome. He gets to duel with Kurata's lieutenant, and handles himself quite well. Fifth, there's slimy old Chiang Nan as the bandit chief working a human trafficking racket, who accepts Kurata as a paying guest, and Chen as a hard-fighting new gang member. Chiang was one of my favorite character actor villains in the early 70's, and it's still fun to watch him. Finally, there's the great confrontation battle between Chen and Kurata. Endurance and courage against speed and viciousness. It's still worth waiting through the usual bad writing and endless series of small match-ups to see it.

        “There are some amusing continuity errors. The time frame is supposed to be the late 1920's, but at one point when the Hong Kong Police are about to make a raid, they arrive in vehicles of the 1960's. Also, clothing styles are a mixed bag (these films were very, very low budget) and never believable as period costumes. To show that Kurata and his bud are Japanese, they wear cheap summer vacation Happy Coats as a substitute for kimonos....”  Internet Movie Database


DON’T TURN THE OTHER CHEEK  (a/k/a LONG LIVE DEATH, a/k/a LONG LIVE YOUR
          DEATH, a/k/a VIVA LA MUERTE...TUA! (Original title), a/k/a VIVA LA MUERTA TUYA!,
           a/k/a ELAKOON KUOLEMASI, a/k/a ET VIVA LA  REVOLUTION!, a/k/a GIGANTES
           STIN PARANOMIA, a/k/a HIRTTOTUOMIO, a/k/a LEVE DODEN, a/k/a LONG LIVE
           DEATH....YOURS!, a/k/a O THANATOS SOU I ZOI MOU, a/k/a ZIVJELA SMRT...TVOJA!,
           a/k/a ZWEI GALGENVOGEL GEBEN ZUNDER, a/k/a ZWEI TOLLE COMPANEROS,
           a/k/a ZWEI WILDE COMPANEROS)

1974; color; 93 Mins.; Rated "PG",

Director:                      Duccio Tessari (ZORRO, BEYOND JUSTICE, KISS KISS...BANG BANG)
Asst.Dir.:                     May Velasco
Writers:                        Juan De Orduna Y Fernandez, Massimo de Rita, Gunter Eber, Dino Maiuri
Editor:                          Enzo Alabiso
Composer:                    Gianni Ferrio
Cinematog.:                 Jose Fernandez Aguayo
Writers:                        Juan de Ordune, Massimo de Rita, Gunter Ebert, Dion Maiuri
Set Decor.:                    Piero Filippone
Costumes:                     Jurgen Henze
Story:                           “The Killer from Yuma,” by Lewis B. Patten
Cast:                              Eli Wallach, Lynn Redgrave, Franco Nero,  Marilu Tolo, Horst Janson,
                                        Dan van Husen, Eduardo Fajardo, Mirko Ellis, Victor Israel, Jose Jaspe,
                                        Carla Mancini, Furio Meniconi, Enrique Espinosa, Rudy Gaebell, Gunda
                                        Hiller, Jose Moren, Luigi Antonio Guerra, Gisella Hahn, Jose Jaspe

MARTIAL ARTS/ACTION/WESTERN

SYNOPSES:    “A spaghetti western in which three adventurers team up during the Mexican Revolution. Mary O'Donnell, a radical Irish journalist, wants to foment a peasant revolt in Mexico. She enlists the help of a seedy bandit, Lozoya, by saving him from a death sentence in Utah. They meet a man calling himself Prince Dmitri Vassilovich Orlowsky, who claims to be a Russian prince, not to mention a man of the cloth. Wallach pretends to be a Mexican folk hero. The trio crosses the border, the two men seeking a cache of gold while O'Donnell pursues her revolution. Lozoya has the key to the gold, but Nero knows where the other half of the map is.” Internet Movie Database    

        "Tongue-in-cheek spaghetti western offers a female Irish revolutionary, a fake Russian nobleman, and a Mexican bandit teaming up to spread mayhem during the Mexican Revolution."  Corel All Movie Guide 2

Note: Released theatrically in the U.S. on the “action track” by Silverstein Films, Inc., now renamed Filmworld Distributors, Inc., a subsidiary of Films Around The World, Inc. English-dubbed version registered for copyright by Silverstein Films, Ltd. Pau 000867174


DRAGON'S INFERNAL SHOWDOWN, THE (a/k/a LONG HU XUAN FENG (original title))

1983; color;90 Mins; MPAA “R”

Director:               Godfrey Ho
Cast:                      Dragon Lee, Cheryl Meng, Jacky Check, Fei Lung, Yan Chuan, Mark Long

MARTIAL ARTS:     “A young man watches the brutal murders of his parents, and with the help of a cousin vows to get chopsocky revenge.” AMG All-Media Guide

Note: Released theatrically in the U.S. on the “action track” by Silverstein Films, Inc., now renamed Filmworld Distributors, Inc., a subsidiary of Films Around The World, Inc.



DUEL OF THE IRON FIST (a/k/a THE DUEL, a/k/a DA JUE DOU (original title) )

1971; color; 2.35: 1
            
Director:                         Cheh Chang
Writer:                            Kang Chien Chiu
Music:                             Yung-Yu Chen
Producer:                        Runme Shaw
Cibnematog:                  Mu-To Kung
Editor:                             Tink Gung Kuo
Cast:                                 Lung Ti, Ping Wang, Jeanette Yu Wei, David Chang, Yuan Chuan,
                                           Chih-Ching Yang, Feng Ku, Kang-Yeh Cheng, Hui Hsla, Bin He, Ching Ho
                                          Wang, Liu Hung, Chung Wang, Kuang Yu Wang, Kang Liu, Lei Cheng,
                                          Sing Chen, Cliff Lok, Yunzhong Li, Ming Chiu, Hsiung Chao, Wei Lieh Lan,
                                          Ai Lien Pan, Pei Kuo, Yi Kuo, Kuan Tai Chen, Kuan Chin, Hak On Fung,
                                          Hsieh-su Fung, Han Chou Ho, Hsiung Kao, Lung Lie, Wai Lo, Wei Lu,
                                          Chia Wen Pao, Yan Tsan Tang, Chi Chin Wu, Leng Kuang Yin

Amazon DVD Customer Reviews:

        “for those of us older kung fu movie heads i had to say i saw this movie for the first time when i was about 13 and i can say the dvd i recieved sucked they sliced some serious plot scenes out of this movie and even the ending has been sliced out of this movie what gives!!!?”

        “David Chiang is superb in this one. A kung fu expert with a bad cough who must batle [sic] the great Lueng at the end of the movie. Lueng who was in John Woo's " A Better Tomorrow". Plays a carefree streetfighter who must do batle with the establishment and of course David Chiang who was brought in to deal with Lueng. The final batle between Chiang and Lueng in the rain at the end is fantastic, very well staged.And the ladies will love the tattoed buterfly on Lueng's chest, a symbol of his love for his lovely lady. I strongly recommend this one. It's a must see.”

        "The Duel" was a good early kung-fu movie from director Chang Cheh, starring David Chiang and Ti Lung. It's an excellent movie for its time (1971) and watching it now reminded me why I wanted to look like cool, dashing David Chiang when I was a kid. However, the basic plot was re-used and refined in a later (1980) Chang Cheh film titled "Flag of Iron", starring the Venom team. "Flag of Iron" had not only refined the plot, but also featured better actions from the acrobatically-skilled Venom team. Unless you want to watch a youthful David Chiang and Ti Lung for nostalgia sake, I would suggest getting the better "Flag of Iron" movie instead.”



DYNAMITE DRAGON (a/k/a THE DYNAMITE TRIO, a/k/a THE MASTER OF THE
     MANTIS, a/k/a DRAGON’S SHOWDOWN, a/k/a LONG QUAN SHE SHOU (Original     title)

197__; color; 90 Mins.

Director:                 Godfrey Ho
Producers:              George Lai, Joseph Lai, Tomas Tank
Editor:                     Vincent Leung (as Yung Tsan Liang)
Martial Arts:          Teddy Deng
Cast:                         Dragon Lee, Cherly Meng, Hwang-ki Beek, Hyeong-Kan Choi, Min Kyu Choi,
                                   Hak-ja Jo, Ja-ho Lim, Yi-min Li, Do-shik Ma, Ghui Meng, Bok-ki Min, Il-joo
                                   Yoon

MARTIAL ARTS:     Good-guy vs. bad-guy; good guy wins.

  Note: Released theatrically in the U.S. on the “action track” by Silverstein Films, Inc., now renamed Filmworld Distributors, Inc., a subsidiary of Films Around The World, Inc.


HONORABLE HORSE (a/k/a SHOOT FIRST...ASK QUESTIONS LATER, a/k/a
    SAMURAI SWORD, a/k/a RING AROUND THEHORSE’S TAIL, a/k/a/SAMURAI WARRIOR,
     a/k/a/ BIANCO ROSSO EGIALLO, a/k/a IL BIANCO, IL     GIALLO, IL NERO (Original title) )

1975; color; 99 Mins.; 35mm, Techniscope, 2.35: 1 

Director:                     Sergio Corbucci
Writers:                      Mario Amendola, Renee Asseo, Luis G. de Blain, Sergio Corbucci, Marcello
                                      Coscia, Santiago Moncada, Antonio Troiso
Cinematog.:               Luis Cuadrado
Music:                         Guido & Mauricio De Angelis
Editor:                        Eugene Alabiso
Cast:                            Eli Wallach, Gugliano Gemma, Tomas Milian, Carla Mancini, Mirta Miller,
                                     Manuel de Blas, Jacques Berthier, Romano Puppo, Nazzareno Zamperia,
                                     Edy Biagetti, Hideo Saito, Frank Nuyen, Lorenzo Robledo, Giovanni Petrucci,
                                     Tito Garcia, Franco Tocci, Cris Huerta, Rafael Albaicin, Lorenzo Pinni,
                                     Pascual Barrachinar, Anne Bataille, Alfonso de la Veta, Beni Deus, Ana
                                     Farra, Lisardo Iglesias, Luis Induni, Maria Isbert, Victor Israel, Ricardo G.
                                     Lilo, Jose Panizo, Fernando San Jose, Joaquin Solis, Pietro Torrisi, Dan van
                                     Heusen, Jose Villasente, Ernesto Yanez

MARTIAL ARTS/WESTERN/COMEDY

Synopsis:    “Don't go into this film expecting a typical Corbucci high body count shoot 'em up. This time around the famous `other Sergio' takes a stab at the comedy/spaghetti sub-genre which was ever so popular in the waning days of the Euro Western. `Bianco, il giallo, il nero, Il' is more or less a bizarro take on the East meets wild West classic `Red Sun'. Eli Wallach plays `Black Jack Gideon', a straight and narrow lawman who reluctantly gets mixed up in a quest to recover a prize Japanese show pony that's being held for ransom by a renegade band of army deserters with a penchant for dressing up like Indians. Accompanying him on his journey are the notorious bandit and womanizer `Swiss', played by Giuliano Gemma and `Sakura' the dung handler turned Samurai played by Tomas Milian. Many unintentional laughs and moments of genuine surreal weirdness set to the equally strange Guido & Maurizio De Angelis score almost guarantee this film to delight fans of the genre and confuse and frighten the average viewer. “ Internet Movie Database

        “The Emperor of Japan has sent the United States President a very special Asian horse.  Three incredible rogues hear of this horse and decide to kidnap it for a $500,000 ransom.  One of them (the “white” in the Italian title) is Giuliano Gemma, a grandiose kleptomaniac.  Tomas Milan is the “yellow,” a Japanese Samurai, and the last (“black”) is Eli Wallach, a goofy and gullible sheriff who has been victimized by “white” before, and will be again.  The alliance between the three is a shaky thing, but “black” will have stumbled into clover.”

U.S. Copyright:  this title not registered as of 2/5/2011; not clear if a GATT-Reversion notice was filed for this title in 1997 because of the numerous alternative titles , some of which are in German

Note: Released theatrically in the U.S. on the “action track” by Silverstein Films, Inc., now renamed Filmworld Distributors, Inc., a subsidiary of Films Around The World, Inc.


INFRA-MAN (a/k/a SHONG GUO CHAOREN (original Hong Kong title), a/k/a CHINESE
       SUPERMAN (Hong Kong working title),a/k/a CHUNG KWOK CHIU YAN  (Hong Kong
       Cantonese title), a/k/a INFRAMAN L’ALTRA DIMENSIONE, a/k/a INVASION AUS DEM
       INNEREN DER ERDE, a/k/a MANZITER, a/k/a THE INFRA SUPERMAN, a/k/a THE
       SUPER INFRAMAN)

1975; color, 2.35: 1

Director:          Shan Hua
Producer:        Runme Shaw
Music:              Yung-Yu Chen
Cast:                 Danny Lee, Terry Liu, Hsieh Wang, Man-Tzu Yuan, Wen-Wei Lin, Dana,
                           Chien-Lung Huang, Lu Sheng, Yang Chiang, Chun Chin, Jen Kwan, Bruce Le,
                           Fanny Leung, Tsun Liu, Wai Lo, Shun-Yee Yuen

Synopsis:    “The surface of the Earth is under attack, thousands of people are killed in this unprovoked attacked. The cause, Princess Dragonmon and her army of monsters have decided to invade. Princess Dragonmon is an alien whose race has been hiding under us for centuries waiting to attack and the time is right. A doctor has been preparing for something like this and turns his assistant Rayma into the cyborg hero known as Inframan. Now only Inframan stands between the Earth and Princess Dragonmon but when a close friend is captured and brainwashed, can she be stopped with this inside man feeding her info? “ Internet Movie Datqbase


KARATE WARRIORS (a/k/a KOZURE SATSUJIN KEN)

1976 (1981 in U.S.); color; 89 mins; MPAA Rated "R"; 2.35: 1

Director:                     Kazuhiko Yamaguchi
Writer:                        Tatsuhiko Kamoi
Cast:                             Sonny Chiba,Isao Natsuyagi, Akane Kawasaki, Akiko Koyama, Hideo
                                       Murota,  Tatsuo Umemiya         

Synopsis:    “The fourth and final film in the “Street Fighter” series, where Tsurugi protects a little boy while coping with rival gangs.”

        “Chico arrives in a city where there are two waring gangs. Chico gets wind of a large hidden stash of heroin owned by the, now dead, former leader over all of the gangs and sets off to find it and keep the two gangs at war. Meanwhile, he as befriended a small boy whose father is a samurai assassin working for the rival gang.”  Internet Movie Database

        “"The Deadliest Dragon That Ever Smashed the Street Gangs!" "Karate Warriors" is a somewhat confusing but enjoyable final entry in the "Street Fighter" series we all know and love.The story this time around involves Chico (Chiba) a mysterious man who arrives in a town run by two warring gangs. Chico has to make sure they keep warring because he wants to get the heroin stash and keep the gangs off his back. Meanwhile he develops a friendship with a young boy. Added into this mix is a crazy man who dresses in traditional samurai garb and is chopping people up with a samurai sword. Will Chico use his awesome beat-em-up skills to win the day? The VHS tape under consideration for this review is titled "Karate Warrior". While the on-screen title reads: Karate Warriors. The Karate Warrior print has poor dubbing and it is Pan & Scan. It is hard to tell who is talking on screen. The plot is hard enough to decipher as it is, without having to figure who is talking - Kelso? Or Heega? While the gangs are confused and wondering if Chico is a "Karate Fighter?", Chico has already made his way through some impressive fights. For example, in a brawl with a man that appears to be a lumberjack, he rips Chico's sleeve and it is clobberin' time! These technical flaws are almost forgotten about because the fights are so cool and fun to watch. The fights are slowed down and sped up for maximum impact. Chiba takes no prisoners and it looks like the kicking and punching is full contact. The fights are brutal in true "Street Fighter" tradition and the tempo changes are almost musical.

        “The final battle takes place on a beach and we wonder if Chico is going to find the key to the hidden heroin stash. But before he can get there, there is an all-out melee. Impressively, it is a sword and karate fight at the same time! Chiba does display a sensitive side with the young tot. Insanity is reached with the the crazy Samurai guy in modern day 70's Japan.”  Internet Movie Database

Note: Released theatrically in the U.S. on the “action track” by Silverstein Films, Inc., now renamed Filmworld Distributors, Inc., a subsidiary of Films Around The World, Inc. .  Domestic home video licensed to BCI/Navarre for 7 years from October 6, 2006 + 6 month sell-off period;
Toei confirmed U.S. rights owned by us in perpetuity.   BCI/Navarre liquidated by parent and no longer in DVD business; attempting to recover masters and formally terminate agreement.


KUNG FU-RY! (a/k/a HUANG SE SHA SHOU (Hong Kong Chinese title), a/k/a FROM
      BANGKOK WITH ORDERS TO KILL, a/k/a THE YELLOW KILLER (Hong Kong English title),
      a/k/a WONG SIK SAT SAU (Hong Kong Cantonese title)

1972; 1975 in U.S.; Technicolor; MPAA “R”; 85 Mins.; Technicolor; 2.35: 1 English-dubbed MPAA Rating: R

Director:                 Jimmy Shaw [US Theatrical Poster: Shaw Fung James]
Cinematog:            Lu Ying Ho (Internet Movie Database) [US Theatrical Poster: Lin Ho]
Cameraman:         Wong Tai [U.S. Theatrical Poster]
Editor:                     William Leung [U.S. Theatrical Poster]
Producer:                K.S. Cheung [U.S. Theatrical Poster]
Sound Rec.:             Electronica Calpini [U.S. Theatrical Poster]
Musical Score:       J. Koo [U.S. Theatrical Poster]
Writers:                   Kang Chien Chiu, Jimmy Shaw
Stunts:                      Siu Peng Chang, Siu-Lung Leung [US Theatrical Poster: “Fights Staged By
                                         S.P. Chan & S.L. Lieung]
    Cast:                      Ying Bai, Nan Chiang, Kwan Chin, Paul Chun, Ka Ting Lee, Siu-Lung Leung,
                                    Chiang Su, Ta Weng, Ing-Sik Whang, Ho Yam, Corey Yuen

Synopsis:     "The Kung-Fu hit man couldn't make it as a cop!  He took matters into his own hands -- weapons more deadly than guns!" *1/2, Corel All Movie Guide
 
NOTE: Hilltop Films Ltd. obtained rights in perpetuity, and licensed U.S. distribution rights to Lurco, which in turn sublicensed the rights to Joseph Green Pictures; both of the licenses expired, and rights reverted to Hilltop; FATW effectively distributes all Hilltop films in perpetuity.



MANTIS VERSUS THE FALCON CLAWS (a/k/a MANTIS VS. FALCON, a/k/a MANTIS
     DANS LES GRIFFES DU FAUCON, a/k/a MANTIS UNDER FLACON CLAWS)

1983 (Hong Kong); 81 mins;  color

Director:                 Mitch Wong
Writer:                    Jack Tsui
Producers:             Chong-chan Park, Tomas Tang
Music:                     Ricky Chan
Editor:                    Vincent Leung (as Leung Wing Chan)
Cast:                        Alain Ko, Sonny Man, Gary Cho, Bo Yuen, Billy Ng, Mike Cheun, George Ta,
                                  Christina Ho, Vincent Lee

Synopsis:    “A silk dealer and a princess are traveling in the China country, when they are attacked by a group of Falcon bandits. The bandits kidnap the princess and steal the silk. The princess's father makes an effort to free his daughter, but fails, and the bandits demand a ransom. Meanwhile, the slik dealer goes to a Shaolin temple, and trains to learn Mantis kung fu. After much intense training, he goes after the bandits.” Internet Movie Database


RED DRAGON, THE  (a/k/a SO HAK-YI)

1993, color, 1:85: 1

Director:                    Woo-ping Yuen
Production:               James Mou
Cast:                            Sheila Chan, Hoi-Shan Kwan, Man Tat Ng, Fong Pao, Yuk Wong, Xin Xin
                                      Xiong, Donnie Yen, Fennie Yuen

Synopsis:    “Action-packed as usual with Donnie Yen kicking his adversaries in the role of "Beggar Su". Basic plot revolves around a young Beggar Su getting addicted to opium and manipulated by a scheming imperial prince to fight against WFH and assassinate a righteous general. As expected, Beggar Su repents and gangs up with WFH against the prince in a climactic battle. Guess who you have helping the prince, the White Lotus sect of course... “ Internet Movie Database

        “This was a pretty good period kung fu movie. Once again, Yuen Woo Ping and Donnie Yen team up in this OUATIC-esque story about Beggar So and Wong Fei Hung teaming up to fight opium dealers. Donnie Yen is excellent, his skills are superb. The actor who plays Wong Fei Hung is talented as well. I wish that Donnie Yen had more fighting time in the movie. His fight against Xiong Xin Xin was good, but it seemed a bit short. I also thought that the movie was too bloody at times. Setting that aside, it is an entertaining movie.” Internet Movie Database
    

REVOLT OF THE DRAGON

1975; Color; 85 Mins.

Synopsis:    “Revolt of the Dragon relies on a tried-and-true western movie plot to get itself in
gear.  We all remember the one about the returning Civil War veteran who discovers that his home town has been overrun by plunderers and thieves.  Transplant this plot device into the soil of the Orient, and you’ve got Revolt of the Dragon.  The hero calls upon his extensive martial-arts expertise to thwart the villains.  Despite the presence of the word “dragon” in the title, Bruce Lee is not among the cast members.” AMG All-Media Guide

U.S. Copyright:  this title not registered as of 2/5/2011; there are a few recorded documents under this title but the reference to the registration number, as opposed to the documents, is noted by the Copyright Office as “not verified”.  There is no way to know if these filings relate to this movie or not.

Note: Released theatrically in the U.S. on the “action track” by Silverstein Films, Inc., now renamed Filmworld Distributors, Inc., a subsidiary of Films Around The World, Inc.



RIVALS OF THE DRAGON (a/k/a FEI HAO (Original Hong Kong title, a/k/a FEI HOK
    (original Hong Kong Cantonese title), THE CRIME (original Hong Kong English title)

1980; color; 2.35: 1

Director:                  Simon Hsu
Writer:                     Paul Ko
Producer:                Yeung Kwan, Fung-chi Yue (as Florence Yu)
Music:                       Michael Tse
Cinematog.:            Adam Blacksmith
Editor:                      Kwang Che Ching
Cast:                          Jeffrey Chan, Tak Yuen, Bruce Chan, Joseph Yeung, Ken Thomson, Pardon
                                   Au, Dickson Wong, Stephen Chiu, Thomas Hope, Willian Cobalt, Samuel Kent,
                                   Lily Taylor

 
SHAOLIN: THE BLOOD MISSION (Hong Kong English title), a/k/a SADAE SOLIMSA
     a/k/a FOUR SHAOLIN TEMPLES, a/k/a THE FOURTH LARGEST SHAOLIN     TEMPLE)

1984; Color; 2.35: 1

Director:                   Woo-Sang Park
Writer:                      Ji-woon Hang
Producer:                  Tae-won Lee
Music:                       Jeung-geun Jeon
Cinematog.:             Jin-hwan Lim
Editor:                       Dong-chun Hyeon
Cast:                          Jeong-li Hwang, Kuk-myeong Son, Jang Lee Hwang, Frankie Poon, Jack Sun

Amazon Customer DVD Review:

        “Shaolin:the blood mission-----Hwang Jang Lee. Do you want me to go on. Fine then, but I'm not telling you much, and before I do, I have to ask. Do you need me to tell you about the dvd when you have Shen Chan in one movie, then you have Jang lee in the next? The answer is no, so you are just gonna have to trust me that Hwang Jang Lee vs. Shaolin is a guaranteed classic. You have around 4-5 GOOD fighters in this movie. Don't expect this to knock the pants off of secret rivals or hell'z windstaff, but, but wait a minute, I take it back, it does come very close to being as good as hell'z windstaff....”


SONNY CHIBA'S DRAGON PRINCESS (a/k/a DRAGON PRINCESS)

1981; color; 90 mins.; *

Cast:                         Sonny Chiba, Sue Shiomi

Synopsis:    “Dragon Princess stars martial-arts perennial Sonny Chiba, along with Sue Shiomi.  He’s a Karate masster, she’s the title character.  Both demonstrate a great deal of intestinal fortitude when they confront the blind master of the “Bloody Blades.”  It’s a satisfactory genre entry, even though it yields few surprises.  Evidently, Dragon Princess was filmed several years before its 1981 US release.” AMG All-Media Guide

        “Karate master Kazuma gets severely beaten and crippled by nefarious rival Nikaido. Kazuma trains his loyal daughter Yumi in the martial arts so she can exact a harsh revenge on Nikaido and his band of evil thugs.

        “First watched 9/15/2002 - 4 out of 10(Dir-Yataka Kodaira): Ok karate flick with long-winded final fight scene and shaky camera-work throughout. The camera-work that is done lessons the karate action because it's hard to tell what actual moves are being done and their impact on the intended victim. The plot has been used before(vengeance asked for by the father on his death bed) in films of this genre and there is a fitting ended for those who care enough to stay until the end. If you make it till then, you're a better man than most of us or your interest in the karate action genre is what keeps you close. What you can see of the karate scenes is well-choreographed and this is the reason that I gave this movie a higher rating than what I had originally expected it would receive.” Internet Movie Database

Note: Released theatrically in the U.S. on the “action track” by Silverstein Films, Inc., now renamed Filmworld Distributors, Inc., a subsidiary of Films Around The World, Inc. Our rights in perpetuity confirmed by Toei. 


WORLD OF THE DRUNKEN MASTER, THE  (a/k/a JIU XIAN SHI BA DIE (original Taiwan
     title), a/k/a CHOW SIN SAP BAT DIP (original Hong Kong Cantonese title), a/k/a DER
     TODESHAUCH DES DRUNKEN MASTER, a/k/a DRUNKEN DRAGON, a/k/a WORLD OF
     THE DRUNKEN MASTER)

1979, color, 2.35: 1

Director:               Joseph Kuo
Writer:                  Shan-hsi Ting
Producer:             Joseph Kuo    
Cast:                      Pai Ah, Jeanie Chang, Hui Lou Chen, Long Ten Hsiang, Yi-min Li, Jack Long,
                                Mark Long, Fei Lung, Ting Wo Wang, Yu Wang, Siu Tien Yuen, Sung Hsi Yu

Review:    “This is another version of the popular "Drunken Master" tale of Beggar Su, an old drunkard who perfected "Drunken kung fu," so memorably portrayed by Simon Yuen in Yuen Wo Ping's DRUNKEN MASTER (1978), one of the two films that propelled Jackie Chan to his early stardom. The DVD case for WORLD OF DRUNKEN MASTER (1979) is somewhat misleading in that it promotes Simon Yuen, old "Drunken Master" himself, as the star. However, Simon appears only in a prologue sequence doing kung fu moves on a beach as the narrator tells us the story of the friendship of Fang Ta Rei and Beggar Su. Then, as the story begins, a completely different actor plays Beggar Su in a framing sequence that leads to a lengthy flashback detailing how the two men met. In the flashback, yet another actor, Lee Yi Min, plays Beggar Su while Jack Long plays Fang Ta Rei in both flashback and the framing sequence. Chan Wai Lau, an underrated supporting player in kung fu films, plays Chang 7th, the instructor who trains the two young men in "the 18 Falls of the Drunken Immortals." As a result, they're able to fight off attacks by Tiger Yeh (Lung Fei), a local landlord who, after losing a fight with Chang 7th, closes the winery where all the main characters work and then leads his men in an attack on the place. This response is quite baffling since it makes absolutely no sense for a businessman to destroy his own property and disrupt the manufacture of a product he profited from. (But it makes for a lively fight scene.)”   Amazon.com Review




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